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Thread: 4G63 High Performance Balance Shaft Eliminator Kit

  1. #1



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    4G63 High Performance Balance Shaft Eliminator Kit

    AMS 4G63 RACE BALANCE SHAFT ELIMINATOR KIT - NO CORE REQUIRED

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Features

    •Less rotational mass frees up horse power
    •CNC machined for precision
    •Added oil pump gear support
    •Proven performance
    •Core is Required

    Kit Includes

    •AMS spec CNC Machined Race balance shaft
    •Clevite Balance Shaft Bearing
    •Block Off Plug

    Specifications

    •CNC machined
    •Moly/Graphite treated TriArmor bearings

    Applications

    •Fits all 4G63, G4CS and 4G64 blocks.

    Core Info

    •These kits are sold on a core exchange basis, the kit can be bought outright for $349.95 but if you can send in your good condition stock balance shaft then the price for the kit is $199.95. We cannot send the kit until the core is received and inspected. If you order the shaft and will be sending in a core but we haven't received it yet, you will be charged the $170 core charge. Once we receive the core and it is inspected and deemed okay, we will refund the $170.

    About US

    We manufacture and carry only the finest after market accessories for your Vehicle needs. If you are looking for a great product at the best price, then you've come to the right place. All of our products have thorough descriptions and pictures so you know exactly what you are buying, and what it fits. If you ever have any questions please feel free to send us an email or give us a call at 1.954.919.9660

    Pompano Beach, Florida United States
    www.amsperformance.com

  2. #2


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    Or get the $15 Mitsubishi OEM parts.




    Balance Shaft Eliminator Parts
    MD103722
    Balance shaft
    bearing, rear
    (pictured on left)

    MD040597
    Balance shaft
    bearing, front
    (pictured on right)

    MD092785
    Balance shaft
    cap (plug)

    MD098626
    Balance shaft
    stub shaft
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #3

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    You can have your balance shaft machinedClick image for larger version. 

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  4. #4



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    Quote Originally Posted by LSR Mike View Post
    Or get the $15 Mitsubishi OEM parts.

    Balance Shaft Eliminator Parts
    MD103722
    Balance shaft
    bearing, rear
    (pictured on left)

    MD040597
    Balance shaft
    bearing, front
    (pictured on right)

    MD092785
    Balance shaft
    cap (plug)

    MD098626
    Balance shaft
    stub shaft

    Mike, Where did you locate an OEM kit for balance shaft removal kit.

  5. #5



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    Quote Originally Posted by Rahtid View Post
    You can have your balance shaft machined
    This same idea I thought about and it looks like a great idea. Now if I can find the right person to take it on.
    So, not ever doing this update yet I take it that the double bearing side balance shaft gets removed completely and 2 hole bored bearings are installed and turned enough to BLOCK the oil holes. Then a cap is placed on the cover that is left over hole opening to seal it.
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    Then the oil drive balance shaft with a single bearing would be machined like the above image and reinstalled. This side has a single bearing that does not have an oiler hole bored into it.

  6. #6


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    http://www.vfaq.com/mods/balance-shafts.html

    The procedure is for a 4G63, but as we all know they're 98% the same.

    It also tells you how to use the balance shaft to remove the bearings.

  7. #7

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    Couple of questions on performing the balance shaft elimination on the G63B engine. First - who has done it? Second - did you use the stubby shaft kit or the full machined shaft? Last - how much difference did it make to engine vibration? I've bought the shaft end seal, the stubby shaft and had the original bearings removed and reinstalled to block the oil galleries when I had the block prepped. I'd like to know what I'm in for before the engine is back together. I am expecting some harmonic vibration at certain rpm's...

  8. #8

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    my opinion on balance shafts are this. Mitsubishi put them in there for a reason, and taking them out of a factory engine will do you more harm than good. if you have a need to remove them and want to scratch that itch, then you need to have the whole rotating assembly (crank,rods,pistons) of the motor fully balanced by a machine shop. that is the only "safe" way to remove the balance shafts and not destroy the motor long term

  9. #9


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    This link may be helpful to some of you on the fence.
    http://www.jackstransmissions.com/pa...balance-shafts

    Personally, I only pull shafts when I build a dedicated race engine, or significant power house.

    Professionally, I suggest keeping them in for daily drivers and mild builds. They really don't rob power (that you'll ever notice), I've never seen an actual balance shaft fail (belts do, though), and there really is no reason to delete them. It's a popular mod, but technically pointless unless you have built a race engine designed for use without balance shafts.

    I've built with and without.... it makes little difference. Just use a stronger belt if you are worried about failure.

    In addition, you can make your own balance shaft delete easily for about 2 bucks or less. If you cut the pump shaft off and weld the hole shut, you just made a stub shaft. If you pop and flip the bearings on the right shaft, you just made block offs. If you buy a cap or plug from the parts store, you just completed the balance shaft delete. It's really that simple.

  10. #10


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    Quote Originally Posted by Merrill View Post
    This link may be helpful to some of you on the fence.
    http://www.jackstransmissions.com/pa...balance-shafts

    Personally, I only pull shafts when I build a dedicated race engine, or significant power house.

    Professionally, I suggest keeping them in for daily drivers and mild builds. They really don't rob power (that you'll ever notice), I've never seen an actual balance shaft fail (belts do, though), and there really is no reason to delete them. It's a popular mod, but technically pointless unless you have built a race engine designed for use without balance shafts.

    I've built with and without.... it makes little difference. Just use a stronger belt if you are worried about failure.

    In addition, you can make your own balance shaft delete easily for about 2 bucks or less. If you cut the pump shaft off and weld the hole shut, you just made a stub shaft. If you pop and flip the bearings on the right shaft, you just made block offs. If you buy a cap or plug from the parts store, you just completed the balance shaft delete. It's really that simple.
    pretty much sums it up...

  11. #11

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    Hmm, interesting read. Is it viable to use a harmonic pulley from a G62B SOHC engine? Has anyone tested this one out? Looks like I might be having a shot at this...

  12. #12



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    Quote Originally Posted by BradMph View Post
    Mike, Where did you locate an OEM kit for balance shaft removal kit.

    Rockauto has them
    Members come and members go, But the board keeps track of them.
    Check out the Fear Monger by
    clicking HERE.

    The MightyRam50 site is sponsored in part by On Site Concrete Inc.

  13. #13

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    OEM parts are from a mitsubishi mirage. They didn't have the balance shafts.

    And to the posts about them never failing, I've seen at least 6 engines destroyed because of balance shaft failure. Be it the bearings seizing or the belt snapping and flying into the timing belt, i've seen it all.

    I'll post results when I install my spare engine which I just did the balance shaft delete on. I'm expecting some vibrations but I'm a daily driver and I drive a LOT. Over 30k miles on this truck in less than a year. That is a lot of MPG I could save.

  14. #14

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    I know this is a thread resurrection but be careful with what you use for a balance shaft deletion. There are oil pump stubby shafts on the market that do not have the oil channel machined into them. If you buy one of these cheap kits they will eventually destroy the rear pump housing as the pump shaft wears them out. The OEM stubby shaft is cheap enough and readily available.

  15. #15

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    While I have great respect for Jack's trans and what they have done for the community as a whole....That article is complete B.S.
    I would avoid cutting the balance shaft and welding the hole, most times you won't overheat the part and distort it but it does happen, which in turn wipes out the pump. Cheaper in the end to just buy an OEM stub shaft.
    One thing I didn't see mentioned. If you are eliminating balance shafts you need to change the oil pump gears. OEM comes with helical gears, when removing the balance shafts the helical gears begin to push into oil pump housing. Swapping to 1990 straight cut gears eliminates this issue.
    I remove balance shafts every chance I get, I've seen way too many fail and take out motors and expensive turbos. The AMS kit is no better, seen several fail.

  16. #16

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    There are plenty of engines that aren't designed with balance shafts (Mitsubishis included) and they don't suffer from harmonic vibration issues. Reading the Jack's transmission page they like to plug their own products which seem to make them redundant - if you follow their advice and leave the balance shafts in place (I especially like the part about 'torsional whip' and how it is present in all engines - I guess that includes non balance shaft engines too...). I recently gave BradMph's build thread a good read and when I got to the post where the engine he'd freshly rebuilt seized due to a balance shaft bearing failure I felt a little ill. A thorough, ground up rebuild killed by a new spun balance shaft bearing. I have no idea what killed the engine in my L200 but the bottom end bearings look a lot like the same damage Brad's engine had experienced - except when the engine seized it twisted the crank and shredded the cam journals in the process.

  17. #17

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    Sorry for the late reply I don't get on here much.
    When the balance shaft bearing spins it typically pushes off to the side and leaves the oiling hole wide open. Once this happens oil pressure will drop drastically and reduce oiling to the rest of the motor. Keep in mind you now have a shaft spinning 2x the rpm of the motor, once that bearing begins to wear it wipes out the oil pump as well. I've had several cars come through the shop with destroyed motors due to B.S. bearing failure or failure from incorrect oil pump gears.
    I know I have limited posts, to give a little background info I run The 4g63 Shop and build all of the motors we sell and install.

  18. #18

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    O.k. turboskum. You would be the guy to answer the age old question - is it a bad idea to delete the shafts? I mean a proper delete, not a 'cut the ends of the shafts and leave them floating in there' hatchet job...

  19. #19

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    I've done balance shaft deletes on 4g37,4g63, 4g63b, and 4g64. I've always done the elimination using the parts that come on the car, making a stubby out of the stock shaft and unaligning the two front shaft bearings. One of my motors has over 60k on it since the elimination with zero issues. In my opinion a balance shaft delete is probably one of the best mods you can do to the engine to improve performance and reliability. Don't have to worry about a balance shaft belt snapping, taking out the timing belt, and bending valves. Also don't have to worry about a spun bearings taking out a shaft and or oil pump.

    If your reusing the oil pump then make a stubby out of the stock shaft. No sense in putting a new oem stubby into a used pump that is already worn to match the stock shaft. That could cause premature wear on the old oil pump and new stubby. If your buying a new oil pump THEN i would highly recommend a new stubby.

    Also make sure the stubby has the oiling groove, if it doesn't IT WILL CAUSE ACCELERATED WEAR on the two surfaces.

  20. #20

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    I am with mischif, I cut the old shaft to a stubby shaft length, weld up the oil hole in the end, Spin the bearings so they block the oil holes and plug the oil pump with a cap. I revved all my motors to the moon and the only time I had an issue is when i had the factory balance shaft in it, it siezed solid and snapped the B-shaft belt on my turck.

    In the DSM world it is very rare to see a car with factory balance shafts still being used.

  21. #21



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    Ya, me too on Mischif's post. Use what you had if your going to remove or modify the part. Keep things matched up as best as possible, but replacing bearings pretty much leaves it open for anything at that point.
    Removing balance shafts or keeping them always reminds me of talking about religion and politics. Some do and some don't and others might.

    The final say is that it's your truck, do what you want with it.

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