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Thread: '90 2.4 oil pump replacement

  1. #1

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    '90 2.4 oil pump replacement

    TASK INFORMATION BEGINS ON THIS POST

    It's hard to find straight-forward information by some of the thread titles...so I manually searched for oil pump replacement. Still haven't found anything.

    The theory is that when this thread is several posts along, the next person will be able to locate the information and use it.

    So it begins: I'm replacing the oil pump in my '90 D-50. It involves dropping the oil pan (I'm cool with that) and ordering a $177.00 pump through RockAuto...still cool with this. Pennyman suggested I read up on a few threads available here, but nothing really warns me about the road ahead. Any pointers will be appreciated by me and future Rammers.

    First I need the pump and gaskets for that area. An oil pan gasket set. From here, I need suggestions for whatever else needs to be ordered for the job.
    Last edited by royster; 01-19-2014 at 06:56 AM.

  2. #2

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    I'm not certain I'm getting any oil up to the rockerarms.

    There don't seem to be any threads on the forum that take this step-by-step.

    And i have no idea what to do next.
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  3. #3



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    Do you have hydraulic lash adjusters? Or is it manual adjusters?
    If it's like a 2.0 then it's in the front cover. But IDK on the 2.4.
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  4. #4

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    Do you have hydraulic lash adjusters?
    Yes.

    Thanks, camoit. I have the 2.4 and the oil pressure DID come up. I was paniced for a while, though: I know what I SHOULD have seen, but that didn't happen until the engine ran a bit. I had horrible visions of running an engine with no oil flow.

    All is well, and I can post a thread about the experi...wait...this thread IS my experience.

    I owe a post, here.

    Gimme some time to relax and I'll report. Information is also available at the Roy's Garage thread.
    Last edited by royster; 01-19-2014 at 05:09 AM.
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  5. #5

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    Replacing The Oil Pump 1990 2.4 4G64

    If you didn't know it already, you can click on the images to enlarge them

    The common accepted knowledge for timing-belt-run engines is to replace the timing belt(s) every 60,000 miles…some less than that, but the point is: if you’re replacing the timing belt, you might want to consider replacing the water pump and oil pump while you have the engine stripped down that far. For some, the oil pump replacement is a necessity. For myself, I opted for preventative maintenance.

    The first thing you need to do is order the oil pump. I got mine through RockAuto.com and it cost $177.00. This kit came with gaskets, spacers and replacement sprocket with new nut, though I did not use the spacer or sprocket because they were much wider than my 2.4 4G64 wanted.

    You also need to order the oil pan gasket, unless you decide to just seal the pan with silicone sealant. I'm old-school, and recommend the gasket.

    You also want a fresh tube of silicone gasket sealer.

    A few pieces of cardboard will allow you to make a bolt-holder for the various components you’ll remove…this keeps you from putting longer bolts in shorter holes: something quite illegal in at least 47 states. Timing belt cover, oil filter holder, and the oil pump plate are bolt patterns you definitely want to keep straight. I made a holder for the oil pan bolts, but they are all the same length so there might not be a need to keep them in order. However, in any automotive repair, it’s always wise to put the same bolts back into the same hole. Marriage works that way, until the kids move out and the dog dies.

    Shown below: cardboard bolt holders for cylinder head project
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    Acetone is useful for cleaning the mating surfaces, as personal lubricant only works for HUMAN mating surfaces, not automotive.

    You absolutely need to have a Chilton or Haynes service manual, and these run about $20 in any auto parts store. Though you can get the information online, it is good to have reference right there at the work bench.

    Of course, you’ll need oil and a new filter to replace that which you’ll drain in order to get the oil pan dropped. You might want to run some Seafoam in the crankcase for a bit before draining the oil to help keep the engine’s interior clean.

    A couple cans of brake spray cleaner is good to have on hand. If mechanic’s hand cleaner is on sale for a $1, snag a couple cans of it: you can use it to clean off the oil pan once it’s removed. An old (or disposable) paint brush works well for that task.

    All of these items require environmental consideration. If you know anything about the wave of pollution catching up to our society, like the Pacific Garbage Patch, then you know you need to do your part to help keep the planet a little healthier. Cars have been an environmental disaster for us, and the least we can do is minimize that damage with personal responsibility. Yours is not the only vehicle in the world: there are millions of them. Same with the products containers you throw away: the landfills can only hold so much before that crap comes floating back to you some day. The Fukushima tsunami proves it DOES come back at us, and then travels around the world in the natural currents of earth’s water and wind. “Everyone lives downstream”.

    As I highly recommend draining and removing the radiator for this project, you want to be aware of the anti-freeze you are responsible for. Dogs and cats will try to drink it, and it WILL kill them. Avoid that heartache and be sure to keep your drained anti-freeze in containers. Thanks to corporate marketing of ridiculously colored children’s beverages, very small children, too, might think the anti-freeze is “Kool Aid”, and since it IS sweet to the taste, you really need to take care with its handling.

    If I can instill anything on the reader, it is: to resolve yourself to take adequate time to do a good, clean job, and that involves a little extra preparation you will NOT regret. Particularly since you'll be replacing the timing belt and tensioners, easy access to the front of the engine is worth the time it takes to remove the radiator, and you might consider taking the bumper off, too.

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    I don't have that under-bumper skirt on my truck, but if you DO, you'll be fighting it every time you want to get under the engine. You might want to take it off. These are all opportunities to clean and detail parts...maybe paint the bumper, behind the grille and perhaps the radiator tank.

    If you're replacing the oil pump, then your truck has lots of grease and oil on it: take the time to clean this off before you start, and you'll keep the job from getting gunked up. HERE is one idea for de-greasing the engine. If weather permits you to use a high-pressure car wash spray, it's a good investment.

    NOTE: "Silent Shaft" and "Balance Shaft" mean the same thing. These terms refer to the same part.
    Last edited by royster; 01-23-2014 at 10:00 AM.
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  6. #6

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    Again, many opportunities are available: the radiator out means you can turn it upside-down and back-flush it with the garden hose or shower hand-held sprayer. Spray the cooling fins from the engine-side of the radiator, to push out the dirt and bugs from years of trips to the 7~11. When it goes back into your truck, it will now give you better service…all for a few moments of attention.

    And before starting out, be sure a good space is cleared for storing the parts you’ll be removing. Removing a part amidst clutter, and trying to find a place to put it results in a frustrating job. If you take the time before you start, you eliminate 90% of the frustration naturally built-in to haphazard mechanical tasks. If your work area is neat from the start, it sets the pace for a successful repair. In my home-improvement work, I always clean up before and after each phase of a project. I do the same for mechanical repairs. It provides clarity, locates missing tools, and gets rid of empty containers that get kicked around. Take out the trash. Eliminate distraction and confusion. Take out used shop rags. You have a 4-hour repair ahead of you that might take days to complete because you can only work on it 20 minutes a day: make your work space accommodating to a job well done. Clean up after each session, or resolve to start the next session with a clean up and tool re-organizing. You’ll have continuity to the task, and you’ll always know where you left off.
    ________________________________
    The book may tell you a different approach, but you need to start by disconnecting the battery. This does more than eliminate shorting out stuff when you spill that Keystone beer on the starter motor: it also affects the ECU, which monitors electrical components. Put that nosey bizzy-body to sleep while you’re working by disconnecting the battery. When the job is finished, and the ECU wakes up, it will monitor the system, and adjust things accordingly, without starting rumors and gossip about the affairs that went on the night before.

    Where to start from there? It’s all gotta be done, but a good starting point might be removing the fan and water pump pulley, then the crank pulley. The crank pulley has 4 small bolts and the larger center bolt which is 19MM. Designate a ” drive ratchet with the 19MM socket for turning the crankshaft…you’ll be doing a lot of that. You can counter the loosening of the four smaller bolts by holding the center bolt with your ratchet or box-end wrench. Be sure to put the small bolts in a sandwich bag or a container where you won’t lose them. You don’t want to put them back on the crank pulley since you need to put the pulley on and off several times during the operation, for turning by hand (to see the timing mark).
    Next, make a cardboard bolt holder for the timing cover bolts. As there are different lengths that go in specific places, this is an important detail. Draw a couple indicators of where the top is, and where the bolts go…perhaps a crude outline of the two pieces that make up the timing cover. Then remove the timing belt cover.

    If you take the time right now to clean off the cover, inside and out, it is ready to go back into place clean. Then store it thoughtfully. I took the additional care to soak it with mineral oil while it’s out, then before re-installing, wiped the mineral oil off. This rejuvenates the plastic.
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    Be careful to not lose the gaskets in the cover’s grove, and make sure they’re grease-free: when the timing belt goes back in, you want no oil or grease anywhere near it. Have a stash of clean rags just for those areas crucial to clean operation.

    Now it is time to make sure the #1 piston is top-dead-center, and that your timing marks are all aligned. Take the distributor cap off, noting (by the book or the marks you’ve placed on the distributor) where #1 firing position is. It should be just past the bottom cap clip. I marked mine so it’s a no-brainer, and is now second-nature to me. But only because I practiced sure-footed learning.

    Use the center bolt to turn the engine to where #1 is at TDC. You can put the bottom timing cover back on, then the crank pulley, but there are timing marks on the timing belt pulleys and oil gear to show you where the timing marks are. Before we go any further, let’s highlight a problem that occurs all the time: the timing mark for the cam gear. It is a little bump on the cylinder head, and NOT THE TOP OF THE HEAD. This distinction is the difference of being off one tooth, and that difference is huge.

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    You can mark that little bump with a drop of paint or marking pen. The main thing is to know it's your primary timing mark for the cam.
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  7. #7

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    There are clear illustrations in your manual as to where the timing marks are. Don’t worry about the oil gear mark: you’re replacing the pump and will be re-setting it. Once you are sure of the TDC position, remove the timing belt.

    A 10MM hex head wrench-bit is needed to loosen the top tensioner bolt. Then loosen the bottom tensioner bolt and let the timing belt relax. Then you can remove the belt, and if it’s in good shape, store it in a safe place where it can remain untwisted and immune to oil spills. That means the Gulf Of Mexico is out of the question.

    You’re going to have to remove that crankshaft center bolt...the pulley comes off first by removing the four small bolts. The crankshaft bolt holds on the timing gears, and while the book says you need a “helper” to assist you, I managed to do this by myself. It involves taking the inspection cover off the bottom of the transmission. (Be mindful of the nuts and bolts and where you place them). My trans is a 5-speed, but the automatic has the same basics: a flywheel with teeth for the starter. You’ll need to put a screwdriver on the right-hand side of the bottom of the bell housing, in one of those teeth, to keep the engine from turning while you loosen the crankshaft pulley bolt. Do not use the starter motor hole for this task. With the 19MM socket and ” drive handle set to remove the bolt (counter-clockwise) you’ll do well to put a 24” or so piece of pipe on the ratchet handle…some call it a “cheater bar”, others call it “leverage pipe”. If it’s behind your front seat, it’s a “defense mechanism”.

    You can hold the screwdriver in place, on the surface of the bell housing while engaged in the flywheel gear-tooth, and pull (or push) the ratchet with your other hand. Using your leg is fair game. It shouldn’t take much to get the bolt loose, and from there you can just ratchet it off.

    A wheel puller removes the timing gears fairly easily once the center bolt is off. Now you can see the work before you.

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    NOTE! Engine shown is a 2.0

    The timing gears and balance shaft pulley need to come off. The left-side balance shaft gear is held on by a nut that needs to come off...my manual doesn't give any definitive means by which to do this.
    EDIT - Redneckmoparman suggests the following:
    "I would HIGHLY reccomend losening the bolt with the belt installed and the crankshaft held still. Once it is loose you can loosen the belt and remove it. With the belt off the gear should come off easily, and then the spacer behind it, slid on the balance shaft, should come off. I DID NOT DO THIS UNTIL I WAS REMOVING THE ASSEMBLY AND IT WAS TRYING TO BRING THE BALANCE SHAFT OUT WITH IT so please, make sure its just the small part left before you remove the front cover."
    I ended up putting a rag over it and holding it with channel locks while loosening the nut. I later thought that, since the oil pan is off, the balance shaft can be reached from under the engine and stopped that way. That is how I tightened the nut upon re-installation, but take care not to damage the shafts in any way as they CAN get bent or out of balance.

    Forum experts might wish to add their own trick for this glitch in detail. Perhaps a quick jolt counter-clockwise works if the belt is still tensioned. I dunnoh. No one said anything about it, or I missed that part of the movie.

    The nut and bolt for the tensioner come off, too.
    Last edited by royster; 01-25-2014 at 09:37 PM.
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  8. #8

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    The reason you have to drop the oil pan is because the oil sump pick-up is bolted onto the oil pump in there.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Drain the oil, and while it drains, you can make use of the time by wiping off the grease from around the 5,742 oil pan bolts you’ll need to remove. If you didn’t de-grease the engine compartment, you might want to take this time to at least wipe off the cross-member frame under the engine, because you’ll be reaching through there a lot. It’s that, or keep washing your hands and forearms from all the grease you keep getting into. Your choice.

    I did not have to raise the engine to get the oil pan out, though the book says you might need to do so. The oil pan is bolted into the oil pump plate, so it has to be unbolted before you start unbolting the oil pump plate…at least, this is a sure-footed approach. It’s all gotta be done.

    Once your oil is drained, remove the oil pan bolts and save them in a plastic bag or container. As I mentioned earlier, I made a cardboard holder for them, only to find they’re all the same length. I could be wrong about that so pay attention as you remove them. Dropping them all into a tin can with cleaning solution makes for a clean re-assembly, then let them dry, then bag ’em.

    Use a wooden block to tap the sides and front of the pan with a hammer (don’t beat on the pan directly with the hammer). This helps loosen the oil pan gasket or sealer. You don’t want to pry the oil pan lip, because if this action bends the lip, you’ll get a serious oil leak there. To keep the oil pan mating surface true, try your best to knock the pan off its mounted position with tapping it. If that doesn’t work, a very thin putty knife can be carefully used to wedge around the lip of the pan. Beyond that, you might consider explosives.

    Once the pan is off, it can be cleaned and stored. Clean the mating surfaces real good with acetone. When dried, I applied the silicone sealer and set the gasket. I got the gasket in place with the sealer on the pan, then flipped it upside down and put it on the workbench surface, applying pressure to assure an even seating of the gasket. Then, flipped back up, I insured each and every hole lined up. I set it aside to allow the silicone to set. The gasket didn’t slip or fall off as I re-installed the pan, and as MY job is now completed, I can assure you I have no oil pan leaks. So this approach should work for you.
    Remove the two bolts holding the oil sump and remove the sump. Yuck! Whatta mess! Get that thing cleaned up, back-flush it and spray it with brake parts cleaner (unless you opt to install a new one). I found a couple boogers inside the screen, and worked to get them out. Remember: this sump is all there is to keep particles and dropped bolts from entering the oil pump. Oil doesn’t get to the filter ‘til after it goes through this sump. Make sure it’s clean, and that includes the mounting surface, which likely has gasket material on it.

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    It’s time for another cardboard bolt holder, and this one is for your oil pump plate bolts. Since, in theory, you HAVE the new pump there, you can actually just trace the bolt holes right from the pump itself, onto the cardboard. Poke the holes with a poinky object and enlarge them with needle-nose pliers. You want them about ” wide. Make a seperate area on the cardboard...lower left-hand side...for the five bolts that come off the oil filter unit. Designate a separate hole…sort of like a mistress…for a single bolt (it couldn’t find a date) off to one side. We’re about to discuss this mystery bolt and the reason for its being.

    Here comes another crucial point that is missing from my manual: the nut that holds the mysterious Silent Shaft. And the conspiring bolt that protects the Cave of Ali Bubba…he’s the redneck version of the Arabic story. Facing the engine, there is a bolt on the right-hand side, back there near the starter. This bolt is how you access the Silent Shaft secret society.
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    Remove the bolt, and try to get a phillips screwdriver into that hole. Dinner and drinks might work, with a few personal complements thrown in, but since the timing belt is off, it’s perfectly okay to turn the oil pump gear and get that shaft to turn. Get a feel for it: regardless of your heterosexual inclinations, you’ll be handling The Shaft a bit more during this operation. It’s okay: everybody does it, but no one talks about it. That's one reason it’s CALLED a Silent Shaft, based on secret society principles.

    Place that bolt in the cardboard holder in that designated single spot.

    Turn the shaft until the screwdriver goes all the way in, and when you turn the oil pump gear back and forth, you can feel it bump against the screwdriver. Leave the screwdriver in there, for now.

    Camoit provides us this great photo, of a crucial step: removing the vault door to the Silent Shaft Treasury. Actually, it's an access panel to the nut that holds the balance shaft in place. I used a nail-set and hammer to tap it counter-clockwise in order to remove it. Camoit suggests a center punch. At any rate, it comes off so you can remove the nut hiding behind it.
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    Note the plate has an "o" ring, and the replacement ring SHOULD be in your oil pump kit. Play it safe and retain the old ring, for now.

    You left the screwdriver holding the silent shaft because that's how you're going to get that nut loose: holding the shaft in place as you turn the nut counter-clockwise. Your kit may or may not have a replacement nut...next election is 2016...but save it just the same. Instead of a hole on your cardboard holder, use a screw through the nut to attach it to the cardboard...maybe near the lonely Silent Shaft bolt that can't get a date. Also be very sure to keep that cover in a place it won't get lost. As an oil seal, it's a small but crucial component. Perhaps in a sandwich bag, taped to the cardboard bolt holder.

    Removing the oil pump plate bolts:
    As you’ll notice with so many of the manual’s instructions regarding component removal, starting from the outside, working toward the center seems to be the theme. The reason for this is the more pliable aluminum parts against the iron block tend to have a slight curve to them. The aluminum has some “give” to it, and assuring you’re not stressing the part allows this ’give” to not become “break” or “crack”. ” turns are recommended for each bolt, one at a time, several times, until the bolts are finger-loose, then you take them all off, placing them in their cardboard holding cells. This isn’t so important on a part you no longer intend to use, but it IS important when you go to install the new part, which will be a reversal of this procedure. You will install the bolts starting from the center, working your way outward.

    Nit-picky details -
    ... did you disconnect the oil pressure sending wire? It's near the oil filter. It gets lots of oil and grease, so spray it clean with some electrical parts spray or brake cleaner spray so oil doesn't short it out. Inspect the wire for breaks and electrician's-tape it up if you need to.

    ... was your oil guage/light working? If not, get a replacement sending unit.

    ...if you haven't done so, remove the oil filter.
    Last edited by royster; 01-22-2014 at 06:37 PM.
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  9. #9

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    Something the manual says to do next, I had no idea why, nor do I have any concept now, but I will share with you what the manual says, and what I did.

    It instructs you to open the pressure relief valve and take out the plunger and piston. “Take out” could mean dinner and a movie…we WERE trying to get that screwdriver in the hole. The problem I had at this point in the operation is that I couldn’t locate my 22MM wrench, and even if I had it, there wasn’t space enough to get the box end over the bolt.
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    I ended up taking the unit apart after removing it. I cleaned it out real good, and put some assembly oil in things, then reassembled it. The manual’s instructions for re-installation seemed rather casual, so I don’t think this is a crucial step, but it is good to get this component clean, since you’re not replacing it.
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    You see the oil filter unit to the left: it is the first to come off, and the last to go on. It is part of the overall bolt pressure against the oil pump plate, so it will be torqued in sequence as the new pump goes on.

    But let’s get the old pump off, first.

    If you loosened the bolts and placed them on the cardboard holder, then you’re ready to remove the oil filter unit, then the oil pump plate. Tapping with the block will help loosen it, a nudge here and there will get it to come off, but keep in mind there are two oil seals and a balance shaft fighting you a little bit. Keep an eye on the balance shaft end, and make sure it doesn’t come out attached to the oil pump, itself.

    At this point, conduct a real good clean up, get the old gasket material off the front of the block, and clean it real good with acetone. If you haven’t done so yet, get under there and clean off the oil pan surface of the block. You’re now at the halfway mark of your journey.
    ______________________________________
    Almost everything you removed can only be put back one way, so you need not panic about which side of this or that goes where. Take note of the two crankshaft gears, and note the "photographic" impression the gears have left on each other. Note also the flanges between them, as it's important to put these back correctly. The 'photographic' impressions are a big help in re-installing them right. Observe that the timing marks are clear on each part.

    It is VERY important to have these parts as clean as possible, as they conduct the timing of the whole engine by way of a rubber belt...a belt that does not want oil or grease on it.

    You'll find that if you open the old oil pump, even those gears are marked with timing marks. Note that the balance shaft end can only be put in one way: this all helps eliminate guesswork and mal-placing the pieces. It is the oil pump that turns the balance shaft.

    An important note I pass along is that the new oil pump didn't seem to turn clockwise: it bound up, but WOULD turn counter-clockwise. This caused me to panic, but later I found that when the balance shaft is in place, proper orientation takes place. Remember to never turn the engine counterclockwise more than a scoash, a kunt.hair or a tad. This is more important once timing belts are on, but I took caution in not forcing the new pump to turn clockwise.

    It all comes out in the wash.
    Last edited by royster; 01-22-2014 at 06:46 PM.
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  10. #10

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    The information I’m sharing here is intended to be a supplement to the technical manual you should be working from. I performed this task using a Haynes manual, and a lot of common-sense. I find the Haynes manual isn’t too “beginner~friendly” and this is why I chose to produce this thread: to share what I learned, and to clarify steps which are vague or missing in the manual. For those who just want to keep their trucks running good, a repair like this is likely something you‘ll only do once, if it‘s done right.

    PREP FOR RE-INSTALLING
    Check to make sure all your gasket surfaces are clean and ready. It is your choice to replace the pan with just silicone sealant or use a gasket. The nice thing about this engine is there are no main bearings to go around: the entire oil pan surface is straight and flat.

    You’ve probably already removed the oil dip-stick. Now is a good time to cover the dip-stick hole so gunk doesn’t get into it. I also flushed my dip-stick hole, but that’s a personal issue I’m sure many don’t want to hear. One of those spray can caps can be used to cover your own, personal dip-stick hole, just don’t tell your wife. Sticklers-for-detail might want to take this time to paint the dip-stick handle and let it dry. Remember: nobody likes a dirty dip-stick…except my first wife, and unless she’s in your neighborhood, you don’t have to worry about her. Just get a restraining order and you’ll be fine. Mirrors, garlic and crucifix’s can help keep her away, too.
    The bottom of the engine block needs to be clean for the new oil pan gasket or the sealer to do any good. While you’re down there, clean the oil sump surface. You don’t want the oil pump sucking any air, so the surfaces and gasket should be installed with care.

    The front of the block should be clean, too. If you’re installing a new water pump, now is a good time to do it. Once that’s done, you won’t be getting any gasket shavings into the new oil pump work. Be sure to remove any gasket sealer on the pump plate mounting surface of the engine block.

    Using focused care, you can set the gasket onto the oil pump plate back, and the oil filter unit. Note there are very small passages in the oil pump plate, and you DON’T want gasket sealer plugging up those passages. I used enough sealer to hold the gasket in place: more is not better. I smeared it around with my finger to make sure it covered all the surface area necessary, and took care to remove slop-over with a cotton swab. As the oil pump sticks “out”, laying the plate on the work bench, gasket-side down, means the pump needs to hang over the edge of the work bench, but this allows you to squish down on the oil pump plate gasket and assure an even set. Flip it back up and make sure all the holes and passages align, and sealer that oozed out is removed. Set the gasket for the oil filter unit, too.

    Your oil pump kit SHOULD HAVE the oil seals already in place. Just for shits-and-giggles, make sure the old seals didn’t remain on the crankshaft or the balance shaft. While you’re inspecting those, wipe them clean with a rag to remove any dirt or first-wife residual particulate. Using either clean motor oil or assembly oil, give those dudes a thoughtful coat of lubricant…just enough, not too much. Give a coat (or sweater, if the weather’s nice) to the inside of the new seals on the oil pump, too. If your gaskets are set up enough, slowly and carefully set the oil pump plate in place. See if it all matches up good, get a feel for how the whole thing sets. Take note of the right-hand side balance shaft, and how it needs to install. It can only go in one way…unless you removed the mirrors and garlic and my first wife is in your garage/carport/living room.

    Set the oil pump plate back on your work bench. If necessary, call the cops on my first wife to have her removed.

    I’m writing this a week after my own installation, and the Haynes manual is over in my garage. So be sure to follow the instructions in your manual in case I’ve forgotten any important details.

    Get your cardboard bolt-holder at the ready, and clean off any really gunky nuts or bolts. Remember that the oil filter unit’s bolts are separate from the oil plate’s bolts, but work in conjunction with them.

    Remove the screwdriver from the side of the engine: you’ll want to turn the balance shaft in order for it to engage in the oil pump.

    I placed gasket sealer on the gasket surfaces about to mate with the engine surface, with the same care I used for setting the gaskets. It is very important to keep the small oil passages clear of gasket sealer, guys. Poor oil circulation was partly what got me INTO this mess.

    Oil leaks in this area of the engine are fatal: you don’t want ANY oil EVER getting on the timing belt or gears. Oil on the gears can allow the belt to slip, and oil on the belt will cause it to deteriorate. Let this be the cleanest phase of your repair, and that means your hands are clean, too. The gasket sealer on both sides of the gasket are the best we can do to keep dirt OUT of this timing chamber, as well as oil IN its passages.
    With its gasket in place, install the sump pick-up, using the manual’s torque specifications. The sump can only go in one way.

    Place the oil pump plate into position…take your time, don’t force anything…and engage the oil pump/ silent shaft connection. Turn the oil pump shaft to engage the balance shaft’s alignment. When everything is aligned press the plate on, making sure all surfaces are unobstructed and ready for bolts. Be sure to guide the plate over the shafts with new oil seals, and make certain they seat properly.

    Get a couple bolts in place, finger-tight, to hold the plate onto the engine block. Put the oil filter unit in its position and get a couple of those bolts on, too. Press the units against the engine block to get a good seal.

    Set your belt tensioner in place with its bolts. Include them in the torque process. You will need to loosen those bolts during the timing belt phase, but for now, they are an important part of oil plate installation.

    Set the remaining bolts into position, only finger tight. When they’re all in, start with the inner-most bolts, and tighten one-quarter () turn. Work in a clockwise pattern to slowly tighten the outer bolts a quarter turn. Take the time to tighten them all in this way: it will take several turns, but in doing it this way, you are assuring a good seal against the engine block, and you are avoiding cracking the new oil pump plate.


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    Yes, you in the third cylinder: you have a question?

    Yes. Wudduh ya mean inner-most clockwork orange ya glad t’ see me?
    Here is a Serving Suggestion:
    Note this photo is of the pump further along than where we are now. It is only for illustration.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Torque the bolts to manual specifications. Go have a smoke break.
    Last edited by royster; 01-23-2014 at 09:53 AM.
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  11. #11

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    why, you dirty dip stick!

    Attachment 8040
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  12. #12

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    Since you have access to the left-side balance shaft from the engine bottom, you might do well to put the B belt cog in place and tighten it. Holding the balance shaft from below allows you to tighten the shaft’s nut without clamping (and possibly damaging) its gear teeth. Be sure to put the flange back properly, and I remind you of the “photographic” image left on the flange face. The crankshaft flange is important, as it keeps the two belts in their own corrals. (Check your manual for an exploded view of the parts to assure you have them in the right order). So we need to put the crankshaft B belt cog on, and there you pay attention to the flange timing mark positioning...but it can only go on one way, so have some confidence. Set the balance shaft gear to its timing position, get the belt tensioner on, and the belt. Get the belt teeth into the crankshaft gear teeth, and pull the belt so there is tension going up from the right-hand side to the shaft gear. Watch that sneaky crankshaft gear so it doesn't move from your pulling on it. Holding the shaft gear, engage the teeth, then loop the slack part of the belt above the tensioner. Tighten the tensioner according to the manual’s instructions. Make sure the 2 timing marks...the shaft gear and the crankshaft...are still perfectly aligned after the tensioner is tightened. If not, loosen the tensioner and work them until they are. The tensioner is pressed against the belt "finger tight", according to the manual. It does not need a lot of tension...it's only turning the balance shaft...and too tight of a tension will cause Feng Shui issues with your wife and second cousin, according to Lilian Too, but only in the Year Of The Tiger.

    Check your manual's photos for timing positions, and I have also provided one for you below.

    Once the B belt is installed, we’re ready for rock ‘n roll.
    NIT-PICKY DETAIL: Trim any gasket material from the oil pump gasket that might be hanging down along the oil pan surface of the block. I used a single-edge razor blade to insure that the block bottom and oil pump bottom had a smooth transition, keeping the oil pan facing nice and flat all the way way around.

    After coating the engine block side of oil pan gasket with silicone sealer, smear it real good with your finger; the inside-the-pan-side of the bolt holes is the most important: we want to keep oil in the pan. Sealing the outer edges only allows oil to possibly seep up and down the bolts. Be careful not to block bolt holes...that can haunt you later.
    The photo below shows the important area to coat with sealer highlighted in orange.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Reinstall the oil pan, getting a bolt on one of the corners to hold it. (Hold the pan in place so it doesn't sag or drop down from that one bolt). That frees your hand up to get another bolt in, to hold an opposite corner. Get the rest of the bolts in place, all of them finger tight. Work the bolts from the center, outward, in increments of turns until tight, then torque to specifications. (In all honesty, after tightening all the bolts equally with 1/4 turns, I just tightened mine good n' snug, but not too hard). Make sure you put the drain plug back in.

    __________________________________________________ ______
    In the photo below, engine block timing marks are highlighted in red, and pulley/gear marks are in green.
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    __________________________________________________ ______

    SETTING THE TIMING BELT

    This area of repair is notorious for errors, myself included. One of the reasons for these errors is that the instructions are not crystal clear in any manual: a collective of information got me to the point of knowing how to do it right, and I pass this along to you. By suggestion, I took photos for clarity. Take the time to study them so you’ll KNOW.

    Taking the time to read this information, and checking out a video or two is well worth the time spent. It isn’t an impossible task to take off the timing covers…again…after removing the pulleys…again…but if you do this right, from the very start, you won’t have to repeat the operation.

    BradMPH provided a good instructional video HERE.

    With everything torqued to specifications, check around for some of the small details: go ahead and connect the oil pressure sending unit’s wire. The pressure relief valve is back in and tight, yes? The oil pump shaft and balance shaft can turn freely, yes? Okay, then.

    The next step is to install the B belt. That’s the small one that goes on the left balance shaft.
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    The only thing the manual doesn’t talk about is HOW to get the balance shaft nut tightened. I started this post with a tip on that. This is how I did it, and it worked for me.

    Remember that the only reason for this B belt and tensioner is to turn that balance shaft: it serves no other purpose. But without it, your engine will shake like a dog shitting tacks. The balance shafts are to counter-balance the vibrations the engine naturally makes.

    Your crank pulley should be at #1 TDC, as you left it. As well, the cam gear should be close to TDC, too. Remember your timing marks on the cylinder head, because this is one of the errors guys make: using the top of the cylinder head instead of the actual timing mark, slightly below the top.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    With the flange properly placed, get the next timing cog on the crank, and note that the timing marks are all in places you can clearly see.

    Put the nut back on the right-hand silent shaft, finger tight. Get your screwdriver into that “secret hole” and see if it can be inserted all the way, or if the shaft is blocking it. Turn the oil pump gear-shaft (use the unbolted gear if you have to) to its timing position. If the screwdriver won’t go in the hole, turn the oil pump gear another full turn, and then you should have it. Leave the screwdriver in the hole in order to tighten the shaft nut to torque specifications.

    The oil pump kit likely has an “o” ring for the little cap that covers the silent shaft nut. I remind you of this photograph.
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    Replace the oil seal “o” ring, and dab a bit of oil or assembly oil on it, then screw the little door into place. Tap it with your nail-set or center punch clockwise until it feels solid. Good riddance to THAT frikkin’ detail.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by royster; 01-23-2014 at 06:38 PM.
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  13. #13

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    If it's been a couple hours since the pan went on, install a new oil filter and put oil in the engine. I filled the filter up enough to install it without spilling oil.
    The greatest gift you have to give to the world is that of your own self~transformation.

  14. #14

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    TIMING BELT, continued
    If you added oil, check for any leaks. You likely won't find any yet, but if you do, now is the best time to correct them.

    The B belt is on, so anything I write about from here is about the main timing belt and its components.

    It's time to tighten the crankshaft pulley gears. Keep in mind that the timing cover fits over the pulley gears, but not the pulley…so you’ll be putting the pulley in last…and that pulley attaches with four bolts. So no need to panic about this part of the operation.

    On the left-side of the flywheel this time, you jam your screwdriver into a tooth on the flywheel, just as you did to loosen. This holds the engine still while you tighten the center crank bolt. Check your manual for torque specs. Once you've accomplished this, replace the dust cover on the bottom of the transmission, bidding 'adieu' to that dark world down there.

    Please keep your hands clean during this phase of the job: even a slight amount of oil or greasy finger-prints decreases the oomph of your efforts. If you want 60,000 miles out of these timing belts, give 'em the best chance you can.
    The tensioner unit should go on first, and the spring, spacer and retaining hex-head nut over it. Finger tighten the hex-head. Set the tension on the spring: the crooked end of the spring goes on the center piece of the tensioner, and the straight piece hooks under the water pump nub-ula made for it. A pair of pliers worked just fine for me to put the top part of the spring in place. I’m running out of photos to draw on, so this is the only one I’ve got for this illustration. God save your slothful ass if your engine still looks like this. [A 2.0 engine is shown]

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Push the tensioner wheel all the way to the left and lightly tighten the lower bolt/nut...enough so it stays over there. If you’re installing new belts, a new nut/bolt likely came with the kit.

    Check one more time to assure the timing marks are right on the spot. If you did not remove the radiator, you’re having to look down at an angle, so you have to be extra careful. Conducting this operation through the radiator opening is way better for all reasons, I assure you…because I later had to re-set the belt while the radiator was in. Let me tell you why:

    Not knowing better, I pulled the belt tight from the crank gear up the left side, over the tensioner, and around the cam gear. THEN I slipped it on the oil pump gear. What this does is slowly allows the oil pump…attached to the balance shaft…to spin incrementally at a different pace. The silent shaft is geared from the oil pump and it turns at a different rate. Long story short: it will begin spinning out of sync with the rest of the engine, causing vibration rather than transmuting it. This will eventually beat the flock out of your oil pump while annoying you with bad vibrations.
    Next “heads-up”: the pulleys are going to have a wonderful time moving and not cooperating. They have a twisted sense of humor and they don’t respond to mere cussing or threats. Had I thought about it at the time, I’d have left the ratchet on the crank bolt and held it in place with my leg. But you’ll just need to try this out and see what works for you. THE IMPORTANT THING is to get the belt on the crank gears securely…you can flop the left-hand side of the belt up on the tensioner…and pull real tight around the oil pump gear (while not letting the crankshaft move). This may take a few attempts to get it right, but once you have good tension between the crank and the oil pump, pull up tight from the oil pump gear to the cam gear. Really tight, and you do, indeed, sort of slip it on the gear rather than place it up there. You’ll see: the trick is to keep these three gears tensioned this way, while all three stay on their marks. Once you get over the cam gear and the teeth are seated good, then you assure the belt is on the tensioner good. Flat side against the tensioner wheel. Check your timing marks, making sure they haven’t slipped. Loosen the lower tensioner nut/bolt and see if it affects the belt positioning.

    Be absolutely certain about this phase of the job and your truck will run really happy. Just for over-kill, here are a couple photos again for the timing marks.
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    And, finally, make sure that the B belt side of things is where it's supposed to be, too.

    If you’re good on all this, tighten the hex bolt first, then the lower tensioner nut to the torque specifications. I gave mine just a tiny bit more finger-pressure tension before tightening.
    ____________________
    A sort of "Buddy System" is at work, here, and Redneckmoparman promised to review my information and check it for errors. So before I go any further we await the okay to procede. This way, everyone can be sure about the information we're sharing.
    Last edited by royster; 01-25-2014 at 04:08 PM.
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  15. #15

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    Only a few things i would like to note.
    First a easier way to hold the engine is to put a 5 speed in gear, 4 or 5th works best as you have less leverage to turn the tires and engage the parking brake FULLY and if your worried about it holding or just want to ensure that it does you can take a hammer or 2x4 or something similar and place it on the brake pedal and the seat and push the seat forward using it to hold the brake pedal, if you have an automatic then you have to go off the flywheel.

    Second is your one idea for the upper balance shaft i would HIGHLY reccomend losening the bolt with the belt installed and the crankshaft held still. Once it is loose you can loosen the belt and remove it. With the belt off the gear should come off easily, and then the spacer behind it, slid on the balance shaft, should come off. I DID NOT DO THIS UNTIL I WAS REMOVING THE ASSEMBLY AND IT WAS TRYING TO BRING THE BALANCE SHAFT OUT WITH IT so please, make sure its just the small part left before you remove the front cover.

    Third i had no problems pulling off the crankshaft gears with my hands just work it side to side while pulling and it will come off but if you have to use a puller just make sure no damage is caused to the gears

    No other notes to add and all looks well you are doing awesome royster i just might take some pictures to add for clarity if I'm not too lazy lol

  16. #16

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    Thank you, RNMM. I had forgotten the left shaft had that spacer. And loosening the balance shaft bolt/nut while the belt is on is a far better idea. I'll go back and edit that part of the instruction, inserting your suggestion.

    I was unsure about loosening the crank bolt in the way you describe, so I went for sure-footed.

    It's great to have someone else check your work: they'll see stuff you don't, or that you missed.

    So thanks again, RNMM. And feel free to post pics: you KNOW this forum LOVES pictures
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  17. #17

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    REMOVE THE SCREWDRIVER FROM THE SILENT SHAFT HOLE and replace the bolt there.

    Check your timing belt syncronisation by turning the crankshaft clockwise six complete cycles (revolutions). The camshaft, crankshaft and oil pump timing marks will all align every 2 revolutions. The left-hand silent shaft will only be in alignment with all the other marks every 6 rotations. After 6 revolutions, returning to TDC, all your timing marks should align. (If they don't, bite-the-bullet and start the process over, or figure out which cog is off, where).

    If you're confident of your timing, it's time to start putting things back together. Take a few moments to just look everything over, making sure everything is in its place.

    Replace the lower timing cover, then the upper cover, making sure the dust seals (gaskets) are in place. Put the distributor cap back on and secure it.

    Install the crank pulley with the 4 bolts and torque them as specified.

    Install the water-pump fan unit, then slip on the belt(s) for the alternator (and whatever else is running off the pulley). Tighten those accessories as needed.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Install the radiator and the two hoses. Add coolant...take your time: it's having to get around the closed thermostat.

    IF YOU HAVEN'T DONE SO ALREADY, ADD FRESH OIL TO CAPACITY AND AN OIL FILTER. MAKE SURE THE OIL DRAIN PLUG IS TIGHTLY CLOSED. Replace the oil dip stick.

    Re-connect the battery cables.

    Remove all four spark plugs and disconnect the distributor harness-connection at the firewall. This is so you can crank the engine without any load, and without any spark. (This part of the operation scared the heck out of me, because even with lots of cranking, I couldn't see oil gushing up like Beverly Hillbilly bonanzas). (Actually, "Bonanza" came on before "Beverly Hillbillies", but that was Los Angeles).

    I opted to hand-crank the engine several rotations (clockwise) before using the electric starter. I used the center pully nut and a 1/2 ratchet. Make sure the ratchet handle and socket are removed before starting the engine. Remove your half-eaten sandwich from the valve cover, and remove the Mountain Dew can from the top of the battery.

    Crank the engine in 10 second intervals, let the starter rest between cranks. Monitor your oil light or guage. Do this about 4 times. Between each cranking you can remove the oil cap and see what's going on inside the valve cover. Be patient: remember, a brand-new pump is having to prime itself, pump oil through all those passagesways AND the oil filter. It might not be immediately noticeable that oil is flowing freely. And my experience was: although the oil light was on, it did not show any appreciable difference until the engine was actually running.

    EDIT: This in from Redneckmoparman:
    You can crank longer than 10sec and i would reccomend doing so i would say 30-45sec the only problem that can arise is overheating the starter longer than 60sec i advise against and about 10sec inbetween 30sec cranking intervals the problem with short cranking periods is the needed pumping cannot be accomplished at the 200-300rpms when cranking as the pump has to pull oil up, through the pump, and to the filter where it will turn off the dummy light and STILL has not reached any bearings and when you stop cranking it looses any pressure it had so your just starting from where you began
    Replace the spark plugs, set the wires on them, and re-connect the firewall harness.

    Fire that bad muthuh up.

    Have a flashlight handy so you can immediately begin checking for leaks, both oil and coolant. You can remove the oil cap briefly (it can stall the engine, so be quick), and should be able to see oil splashing around in a very short time. However, if no oil is present with the engine running for several seconds, monitor you oil light or guage. The light fading in and out is good: remaining brightly lit is not good. Blinking is a good indication. However, if no oil or oil pressure is obvious, turn off the engine. Listen to hear oil dripping inside the engine down to the oil pan. Look inside your valve cover to see what's going on in there. Check to make sure your oil pressure sending unit is connected.

    It may take several seconds for the oil pressure to get to normal: it did for me, and I was nervous the whole time. But soon enough, joyful little beads of oil were tossing flower pedals everywhere, proclaiming "peace and love" and other reassuring psychodelic catch~phrases. The new pump has had to push oil into all the engine's passages...many of which had drained while the engine sat. So it stands to reason it will take some time for the oil circulation to reach operating standard.

    Keep checking for leaks. Let the engine get up to operating temperature (if no leaking occurs) and then shut it off. Inspect your work and check the oil level. Hook up the timing light and set the timing: for a 1990 2.4 it's 5 to 7 degrees before top dead center. Be sure the engine is at operating temperature before setting the timing.

    To set the timing using the ignition timing connector: http://www.mightyram50.net/vbulletin...ll=1#post26994

    Clean up: the Beverly Hillbillies are coming on, and this is continued from last week, when Granny refused to cook her possum-gut casserole because Ellie Mae was keeping piranhas in the swimming pool. Dumb ol' Jethro doesn't know this and is about to go for a dip.


    Stay tuned: it's bound to be a good show.

    ~royster


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    Last edited by royster; 02-03-2014 at 07:47 PM.
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  18. #18

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    You can crank longer than 10sec and i would reccomend doing so i would say 30-45sec the only problem that can arise is overheating the starter longer than 60sec i advise against and about 10sec inbetween 30sec cranking intervals the problem with short cranking periods is the needed pumping cannot be accomplished at the 200-300rpms when cranking as the pump has to pull oil up, through the pump, and to the filter where it will turn off the dummy light and STILL has not reached any bearings and when you stop cranking it looses any pressure it had so your just starting from where you began

  19. #19

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    That's just excellent information, RNMM. Thanks.

    I try to err on the side of caution, but sometimes that can work against me.
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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by royster View Post
    NIT-PICKY DETAIL: Trim any gasket material from the oil pump gasket that might be hanging down along the oil pan surface of the block. I used a single-edge razor blade to insure that the block bottom and oil pump bottom had a smooth transition, keeping the oil pan facing nice and flat all the way way around.

    After coating the engine block side of oil pan gasket with silicone sealer, smear it real good with your finger; the inside-the-pan-side of the bolt holes is the most important: we want to keep oil in the pan. Sealing the outer edges only allows oil to possibly seep up and down the bolts. Be careful not to block bolt holes...that can haunt you later.
    The photo below shows the important area to coat with sealer highlighted in orange.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Reinstall the oil pan, getting a bolt on one of the corners to hold it. (Hold the pan in place so it doesn't sag or drop down from that one bolt). That frees your hand up to get another bolt in, to hold an opposite corner. Get the rest of the bolts in place, all of them finger tight. Work the bolts from the center, outward, in increments of turns until tight, then torque to specifications. (In all honesty, after tightening all the bolts equally with 1/4 turns, I just tightened mine good n' snug, but not too hard). Make sure you put the drain plug back in.

    __________________________________________________ ______
    In the photo below, engine block timing marks are highlighted in red, and pulley/gear marks are in green.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    __________________________________________________ ______

    SETTING THE TIMING BELT

    This area of repair is notorious for errors, myself included. One of the reasons for these errors is that the instructions are not crystal clear in any manual: a collective of information got me to the point of knowing how to do it right, and I pass this along to you. By suggestion, I took photos for clarity. Take the time to study them so you’ll KNOW.

    Taking the time to read this information, and checking out a video or two is well worth the time spent. It isn’t an impossible task to take off the timing covers…again…after removing the pulleys…again…but if you do this right, from the very start, you won’t have to repeat the operation.

    BradMPH provided a good instructional video HERE.

    With everything torqued to specifications, check around for some of the small details: go ahead and connect the oil pressure sending unit’s wire. The pressure relief valve is back in and tight, yes? The oil pump shaft and balance shaft can turn freely, yes? Okay, then.

    The next step is to install the B belt. That’s the small one that goes on the left balance shaft.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The only thing the manual doesn’t talk about is HOW to get the balance shaft nut tightened. I started this post with a tip on that. This is how I did it, and it worked for me.

    Remember that the only reason for this B belt and tensioner is to turn that balance shaft: it serves no other purpose. But without it, your engine will shake like a dog shitting tacks. The balance shafts are to counter-balance the vibrations the engine naturally makes.

    Your crank pulley should be at #1 TDC, as you left it. As well, the cam gear should be close to TDC, too. Remember your timing marks on the cylinder head, because this is one of the errors guys make: using the top of the cylinder head instead of the actual timing mark, slightly below the top.
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    With the flange properly placed, get the next timing cog on the crank, and note that the timing marks are all in places you can clearly see.

    Put the nut back on the right-hand silent shaft, finger tight. Get your screwdriver into that “secret hole” and see if it can be inserted all the way, or if the shaft is blocking it. Turn the oil pump gear-shaft (use the unbolted gear if you have to) to its timing position. If the screwdriver won’t go in the hole, turn the oil pump gear another full turn, and then you should have it. Leave the screwdriver in the hole in order to tighten the shaft nut to torque specifications.

    The oil pump kit likely has an “o” ring for the little cap that covers the silent shaft nut. I remind you of this photograph.
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    Replace the oil seal “o” ring, and dab a bit of oil or assembly oil on it, then screw the little door into place. Tap it with your nail-set or center punch clockwise until it feels solid. Good riddance to THAT frikkin’ detail.
    Bumped for thillskier's benefit (hope my PM got through)

  21. #21

    Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by royster View Post
    TIMING BELT, continued
    If you added oil, check for any leaks. You likely won't find any yet, but if you do, now is the best time to correct them.

    The B belt is on, so anything I write about from here is about the main timing belt and its components.

    It's time to tighten the crankshaft pulley gears. Keep in mind that the timing cover fits over the pulley gears, but not the pulley…so you’ll be putting the pulley in last…and that pulley attaches with four bolts. So no need to panic about this part of the operation.

    On the left-side of the flywheel this time, you jam your screwdriver into a tooth on the flywheel, just as you did to loosen. This holds the engine still while you tighten the center crank bolt. Check your manual for torque specs. Once you've accomplished this, replace the dust cover on the bottom of the transmission, bidding 'adieu' to that dark world down there.



    The tensioner unit should go on first, and the spring, spacer and retaining hex-head nut over it. Finger tighten the hex-head. Set the tension on the spring: the crooked end of the spring goes on the center piece of the tensioner, and the straight piece hooks under the water pump nub-ula made for it. A pair of pliers worked just fine for me to put the top part of the spring in place. I’m running out of photos to draw on, so this is the only one I’ve got for this illustration. God save your slothful ass if your engine still looks like this. [A 2.0 engine is shown]

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Push the tensioner wheel all the way to the left and lightly tighten the lower bolt/nut...enough so it stays over there. If you’re installing new belts, a new nut/bolt likely came with the kit.

    Check one more time to assure the timing marks are right on the spot. If you did not remove the radiator, you’re having to look down at an angle, so you have to be extra careful. Conducting this operation through the radiator opening is way better for all reasons, I assure you…because I later had to re-set the belt while the radiator was in. Let me tell you why:



    Next “heads-up”: the pulleys are going to have a wonderful time moving and not cooperating. They have a twisted sense of humor and they don’t respond to mere cussing or threats. Had I thought about it at the time, I’d have left the ratchet on the crank bolt and held it in place with my leg. But you’ll just need to try this out and see what works for you. THE IMPORTANT THING is to get the belt on the crank gears securely…you can flop the left-hand side of the belt up on the tensioner…and pull real tight around the oil pump gear (while not letting the crankshaft move). This may take a few attempts to get it right, but once you have good tension between the crank and the oil pump, pull up tight from the oil pump gear to the cam gear. Really tight, and you do, indeed, sort of slip it on the gear rather than place it up there. You’ll see: the trick is to keep these three gears tensioned this way, while all three stay on their marks. Once you get over the cam gear and the teeth are seated good, then you assure the belt is on the tensioner good. Flat side against the tensioner wheel. Check your timing marks, making sure they haven’t slipped. Loosen the lower tensioner nut/bolt and see if it affects the belt positioning.

    Be absolutely certain about this phase of the job and your truck will run really happy. Just for over-kill, here are a couple photos again for the timing marks.
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    And, finally, make sure that the B belt side of things is where it's supposed to be, too.

    If you’re good on all this, tighten the hex bolt first, then the lower tensioner nut to the torque specifications. I gave mine just a tiny bit more finger-pressure tension before tightening.
    ____________________
    A sort of "Buddy System" is at work, here, and Redneckmoparman promised to review my information and check it for errors. So before I go any further we await the okay to procede. This way, everyone can be sure about the information we're sharing.
    I really did a lousy job of cataloguing my repairs. It isn't likely I can re-write them any time soon: I'm working on helping build another website with someone, and that's getting my focus at the present time.

    But this should help you out, Tommy: post questions as you need, whatever thread you deem appropriate (your own or mine).

  22. #22

    Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by royster View Post
    REMOVE THE SCREWDRIVER FROM THE SILENT SHAFT HOLE and replace the bolt there.

    Check your timing belt syncronisation by turning the crankshaft clockwise six complete cycles (revolutions). The camshaft, crankshaft and oil pump timing marks will all align every 2 revolutions. The left-hand silent shaft will only be in alignment with all the other marks every 6 rotations. After 6 revolutions, returning to TDC, all your timing marks should align. (If they don't, bite-the-bullet and start the process over, or figure out which cog is off, where).

    If you're confident of your timing, it's time to start putting things back together. Take a few moments to just look everything over, making sure everything is in its place.

    Replace the lower timing cover, then the upper cover, making sure the dust seals (gaskets) are in place. Put the distributor cap back on and secure it.

    Install the crank pulley with the 4 bolts and torque them as specified.

    Install the water-pump fan unit, then slip on the belt(s) for the alternator (and whatever else is running off the pulley). Tighten those accessories as needed.

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    Install the radiator and the two hoses. Add coolant...take your time: it's having to get around the closed thermostat.

    IF YOU HAVEN'T DONE SO ALREADY, ADD FRESH OIL TO CAPACITY AND AN OIL FILTER. MAKE SURE THE OIL DRAIN PLUG IS TIGHTLY CLOSED. Replace the oil dip stick.

    Re-connect the battery cables.

    Keep checking for leaks. Let the engine get up to operating temperature (if no leaking occurs) and then shut it off. Inspect your work and check the oil level. Hook up the timing light and set the timing: for a 1990 2.4 it's 5 to 7 degrees before top dead center. Be sure the engine is at operating temperature before setting the timing.

    To set the timing using the ignition timing connector: http://www.mightyram50.net/vbulletin...ll=1#post26994

    Clean up: the Beverly Hillbillies are coming on, and this is continued from last week, when Granny refused to cook her possum-gut casserole because Ellie Mae was keeping piranhas in the swimming pool. Dumb ol' Jethro doesn't know this and is about to go for a dip.


    Stay tuned: it's bound to be a good show.

    ~royster


    Roy's Garage Quick Referrence Menu
    Hope this is of service sksksk

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